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DOMESTIC SCAN TOUR REPORT
Land Use and Transportation Coordination

Lessons Learned from Domestic Scan Tour

Prepared for the Office of Planning
Federal Highway Administration
U.S.Department of Transportation

March 2003

NOTICE

This document is disseminated under the sponsorship of the Department of Transportation in the interest of information exchange. The United States Government assumes no liability for its contents or use thereof.



LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION:
LESSONS LEARNED FROM DOMESTIC SCAN TOUR

PREPARED BY THE SCAN TEAM
for the
Federal Highway Administration
U.S. Department of Transportation

Cassandra Callaway
Volpe National Transportation Systems Center

Katherine Fichter
Volpe National Transportation Systems Center

Patricia Rincon-Kallman
City of Houston
Planning and Development Department

Harrison Rue
Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission
and Charlottesville-Albemarle Metropolitan Planning Organization

Robin Smith
Federal Highway Administration
Office of Planning

Emily Tait
Federal Highway Administration
Georgia Division

Felicia Young
Federal Highway Administration
Office of Planning


Group standing underneath arched structure.

Group standing underneath arched structure. Harrison Rue, Emily Tait, Felicia Young, and Katherine Fichter,
members of the scan team, in Jackson, Wyoming. Scan team members not pictured:
Cassandra Callaway, Patricia Rincon-Kallman, and Robin Smith.



CONTENTS

Executive Summary

Introduction

Background

Context

Objectives

Projects Visited


Observations

Partnerships

Leveraging Resources

Demonstrating Results


Conclusions and Recommendations

Lessons Learned

Strategies and Approaches


Appendix A. Amplifying Questions

Appendix B. Printed and Web-Based Materials

Appendix C. Project Representatives

Appendix D. Scan Team Participants



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

BACKGROUND

In the United States, political leaders, planning professionals, and private citizens are increasingly aware of the connections between land use policies and transportation planning. Transportation infrastructure and land use guidelines create the framework within which communities grow, influencing urban and rural development, economic prosperity, environmental quality, and social equity. In many states, however, transportation and land use policies are often considered separately, a disassociation that can lead to inefficient resource-use and excessive environmental impact.

Designing transportation systems that enhance mobility, economic opportunity, and community livability is a major challenge for many communities across the country. To more closely examine local efforts to integrate transportation and land use policies, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) sponsored a domestic scan tour from September 30 to October 4, 2002. The scan team visited Denver, Colorado, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Teton County, Wyoming. Each of these communities is experiencing growth challenges and is exploring strategies for better integrating transportation and land use.

The tour was modeled upon the tradition of the international scan tour, a long-standing effort at FHWA to share information between the United States and other countries on issues relating to transportation planning, design, construction, maintenance, and technology. The work of the scan tour was also based in part on the principles articulated by the FHWA Transportation and Community and System Preservation Pilot (TCSP) Program: to improve the efficiency of the transportation system; to reduce the environmental impacts of transportation; to reduce the need for costly future public infrastructure investments; to ensure efficient access to jobs, services, and centers of trade; and to examine development patterns and identify strategies to encourage compatible private-sector activity.

PROJECTS VISITED

OBSERVATIONS

Whether through partnerships, public participation, or new planning tools, each of the projects visited has established innovative planning mechanisms for the coordination of transportation and land use policies. This shared experience, and the individual efforts of the four projects to develop new approaches to planning, framed much of what the scan team heard during its visits. The following lessons can be drawn from the projects visited about the challenges and opportunities associated with transportation and land use integration.

INTRODUCTION

BACKGROUND

The issue of growth is increasingly important in many American communities, as civic leaders and citizens alike work to find ways to ensure viable, long-term economic prosperity while preserving historic community character. The concept of livability - the notion that growth and development should occur in ways that enhance the human and natural environments in the present and also protect them over the long term - has taken root across the United States, introducing a new framework for local and regional planning. Communities are beginning to consider innovative ideas for meeting the needs of their residents, whether for transportation, housing, shopping, or recreation.

Better coordination between transportation and land use allows communities to plan more comprehensively for housing, for commercial and retail uses, and for the provision of education and other public services, all in the context of accessible transportation. This can mean the installation of a new public transit line, the construction of bicycle or pedestrian paths, or the redesign of a much-used roadway, depending on the needs of the individual community. With its focus on providing options that meet local needs while protecting local assets, sustainable planning offers flexibility and choice.

The development of a multimodal approach to transportation planning strengthens the transportation system by providing redundancy and reducing demand on any single mode. Increased use of alternative transportation can also improve the environmental quality of an area by reducing air pollution and conserving open space. Further, the presence of multiple transportation modes in a community can offer much-needed alternatives for some populations, including children, the elderly, the disabled, and low-income residents.

To more closely examine local efforts to integrate transportation and land use policies, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) sponsored a domestic scan tour to Denver, Colorado, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Teton County, Wyoming from September 30 to October 4, 2002. The scan team included representatives from FHWA, state and local transportation planning agencies, and the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. The tour was modeled upon the tradition of the international scan tour, a long-standing effort at FHWA to share information between the United States and other countries on issues relating to transportation planning, design, construction, maintenance, and technology.

The scan tour focused on innovative planning processes and methodologies that were consistent with the goals of the FHWA Transportation and Community and System Preservation Pilot (TCSP) Program, which was established by the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century. The TCSP Program provides funding for planning and implementation projects and for technical assistance to investigate the relationship among transportation, community preservation, and private-sector development initiatives. Since fiscal year 1999, the TCSP Program has awarded approximately $367 million in local grants to assist communities across the country.

CONTEXT

Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming were identified as states for which the management of rapid growth and the long-term safeguarding of valuable environmental resources are significant issues. To study the experiences of communities within these three states and to consider their applicability elsewhere, the scan team met with individuals and organizations in each state engaged in visioning or other planning and development processes that consider the connections among transportation planning, land use decision-making, and quality of life issues. Among others, the scan team met with individuals working on behalf of city, county, and state government; local political officials; real estate developers; and representatives of non-profit organizations. In each community, the scan team members also were able to visit projects, use transportation systems - aviation, highway, and public transit - study development patterns, and observe the planning and development context of the area.

OBJECTIVES

The purpose of the domestic scan tour was to obtain, highlight, and share best practices and lessons learned in the coordination of transportation and land use planning, particularly coordination among local and state departments of transportation (DOTs), metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs), FHWA division offices, and transportation consultants and contractors. Additionally, of particular interest to the scan team were methods, especially innovative methods, used to involve the general public in major decisions about the development of policies on transportation and land use.

Light rail system behind Denver Union Station

Light rail system behind Denver Union Station, with new commercial development in the background

PROJECTS VISITED

Denver Union Station - Denver, Colorado

In Denver, the scan team met with representatives of the Denver Community Planning and Development Agency (CPDA), the municipal office responsible for all planning, design, and development within the City of Denver. In 2000, CPDA received $175,000 from the TCSP Program to plan for the development of alternative transportation infrastructure at Denver Union Station. First constructed in 1881, Denver Union Station was spared demolition during the period of urban renewal and today offers the potential for a multimodal transportation hub near the commercial heart of Denver. The TCSP-supported effort included studies on the installation of full-service bicycle facilities and an electric vehicle hub at the station, as well as an extension of the existing Historic Platte Valley Trolley to the station. Technical and feasibility studies have been undertaken for all three components of the project, which together complement a large-scale master planning process on the long-term future of the station. The master plan is currently underway and is expected to be completed in 2004. The bicycle facilities - which include storage units, changing areas, and on-site repair services - will be installed shortly, and the electric vehicle facilities are expected to be operational in 2003. The extension of the historic trolley service, which is anticipated to cost approximately $20 million, has no established completion date at the moment. Each of these new transportation facilities will bolster the use of the regional light-rail service that has recently been expanded to serve the station.

Denver Union Station has been the subject of extensive planning efforts over the past decade, all aimed at restoring it to its earlier use as an urban transportation hub, connecting Denver with its outlying suburbs and beyond. Many organizations and individuals have been involved with planning for the future of the station, including CPDA, the local MPO, the regional transit authority, the Colorado DOT, local landowners, and a quasi-public corporation established to oversee initial planning for the reuse of the station. A redeveloped station is expected to play a major role in the future growth of downtown Denver, linking present and prospective rail networks with major highways, existing public transit systems, and other planned transportation infrastructure.

Stapleton Redevelopment - Denver, Colorado

In Denver, the scan team also toured the Stapleton redevelopment site, a project to transform the site of the former Stapleton Airport (closed in 1995) into a mixed-use neighborhood to include residential, commercial, and retail uses. The redevelopment of Stapleton is based on a multi-decade development plan, the first portions of which have only recently been completed. The Stapleton project encompasses 4,700 acres, of which more than 1,100 have been set aside for use as open space and parkland. The Cleveland-based private real estate company chosen by the City of Denver to lead Stapleton's redevelopment works closely with the municipal government to address issues such as zoning, location of utilities, transportation infrastructure, open space, and environmental remediation.

The Stapleton Development Plan, adopted by the Denver City Council in 1995, espouses the values of sustainable development, promoting pedestrian- and transit-oriented development, the use of environmentally sensitive building materials, the installation of environmentally appropriate landscaping, and the inclusion of advanced technologies. Environmental responsibility, economic opportunity, social equity, and quality design are at the core of the vision for Stapleton, a vision of an economically diverse community in which transportation by foot, bicycle, and public transit is supported through design decisions and policy choices. To provide residential options for a diversity of income levels, Stapleton will offer a range of housing choices, from multi-family units to large single-family homes. Furthermore, the major residential, civic, and commercial components of the community will be linked by a system of greenways, for use by cyclists and pedestrians. The retail and commercial construction will also be accessible by pedestrians and cyclists. Stapleton is designed to be a community in which automobile ownership is an option and walking and cycling are viable alternatives for transportation.

Scale diorama of Stapleton

Scale diorama of Stapleton

Envision Utah - Salt Lake City, Utah

In Salt Lake City, the scan team met with representatives of Envision Utah, a public/private partnership founded in 1997 to research growth scenarios for the Greater Wasatch Area1 and to provide guidance, based on public input, on future development in the region. Envision Utah focuses on transportation, housing, employment, economic development, and resource conservation. Envision Utah received TCSP funding grants in 1999 and 2000 totaling $630,000 to develop methods for predicting growth patterns and to support a public outreach campaign on development issues. Envision Utah worked with Utah state government on the development of the growth scenarios, and has continued to partner with state and local governments in the implementation of policies of sustainability.

Pedestrian-oriented signage in Salt Lake City

The work of Envision Utah is based on the Quality Growth Strategy, a planning vision developed through an extensive public outreach process. Compared to a baseline scenario with typical development patterns and infrastructure, the Quality Growth scenario includes an expanded transit system, a higher proportion of multi-family housing and small-lot homes, and greater clustering of new housing in villages and towns along major roads and rail lines. Based on the Strategy, Envision Utah has supported efforts in the Greater Wasatch Area to enhance mobility, provide a diverse supply of housing and employment options, improve air quality, maintain water reserves, and protect open spaces. Envision Utah works with private developers, state and local leaders, and private citizens to encourage the prioritization of alternatives that promote livability and community preservation. An example of Envision Utah's work includes its partnership with the community of Murray City, a partnership to assist local leaders in planning for transit-oriented residential and commercial development near a new light-rail station in the city. In addition, Envision Utah works with and encourages developers to build mixed-use, walkable projects, such as the Gateway Retail Center in Salt Lake City, to help revitalize urban centers.

Automobile traffic in Jackson, Wyoming

Mapping for a Millennium - Teton County, Wyoming

In Teton County, the scan team met with representatives of the Teton County Planning and Development Department and the Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT). Because of its proximity to ski resorts and its location within easy driving distance of Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks, Teton County is a popular vacation destination. As a resort region, Teton County is experiencing rapid population growth and high levels of annual visitation, placing an intense demand on its traditional transportation infrastructure. The effort to balance the needs and priorities of multiple constituencies - the year-round residents, the part-time residents, and the tourist population - requires the thoughtful creation of local and regional partnerships and the development of a planning process that is sensitive to the wishes and expectations of all of the affected stakeholders. In 2000, the Teton County Planning and Development Department received $342,805 from the TCSP Program to support a series of public charrettes on the redesign of several important transportation corridors in the county. The goal of this effort is to develop strategies and recommendations for corridor improvements that meet the mobility needs of a growing population while simultaneously reflecting the values of the surrounding community and its adjacent neighborhoods.

Although still in the early planning stages, the work of the public charrettes has established an innovative framework for comprehensively addressing the relationship among transportation, land use, and growth in Teton County. In preparation for the community-based design charrettes, the Teton County Planning and Development Department met with and interviewed residents, property owners, and other individuals interested in the relevant highway corridors. Some of the meetings were formal and others informal, and all focused on issues of congestion, safety, parking, community character, and quality of life in the county. This process of stakeholder interviews enriched the charrette process by providing a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. The charrette results and recommendations are being used to inform the development of alternatives for highway corridor improvements in Teton County.

Highway to Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

SUMMARY

Each of the four projects visited has its own focus, reflecting the needs of its surrounding community. Envision Utah played a lead role in the development of the Quality Growth Strategy, which is a tool for local communities to better plan for the integration of transportation and land use. The Stapleton project, the result of a long-term process of inclusive public-private planning, will provide Denver residents with a large new community, which includes multiple transportation, commercial, and housing options to meet the diverse needs of its residents. Both the Denver Union Station and the Teton County projects are still in the planning stages, working with the public and with planning professionals to develop transportation alternatives.

OBSERVATIONS

The efforts to develop new planning methods and mechanisms observed in the four projects visited can be grouped into three categories: partnerships, leveraging resources, and demonstrating results. Each of these three themes is highlighted below, with specific supporting examples from the projects visited.

PARTNERSHIPS

Partnerships have taken a number of forms for the projects visited, from informal relationships among influential individuals and organizations to formal agreements between public agencies. In Denver, Salt Lake City, and Teton County, the formation of partnerships has helped to build consensus by bringing together groups with different viewpoints to discuss common issues and to find solutions together. Partnerships observed by the scan team include relationships across geographic boundaries, relationships with organizations outside the realm of transportation, and relationships with key members of the private sector, including developers, financial institutions, and real estate professionals. For the projects visited, partnerships have helped to integrate the needs of industry with community concerns, facilitating the movement of goods, access to jobs, and economic development.

The following are examples of successful partnering efforts from the four projects visited:

Denver Union Station

Denver Union Station

Public sector collaboration to plan the future of urban transportation. In 1996, following a preliminary feasibility study, the Union Station Transport Development Company (USTDC) was founded to oversee the planning, both short- and long-term, for the redevelopment of Denver Union Station. The USTDC was funded by contributions from the City and County of Denver, the Colorado DOT, the Regional Transit District, private property owners, and grants, and helped create the initial institutional relationships that have made collaborative planning possible for the station and have brought the public into the planning process, particularly around issues of pedestrian and bicycle access. The process of developing a master plan is now underway for the station, under the leadership of the Union Station Alliance, a public-private partnership dedicated to the master planning effort. The master planning process involves significant public outreach and involvement, including large public meetings held at the Colorado Convention Center and a mechanism for public input through the Denver Union Station website. The level of collaboration represented by the partners involved with the overall planning process for the station, coupled with ongoing public participation, gives credibility to the process and allows institutional obstacles to be overcome.

Open space and residential construction at Stapleton

Open space and residential construction at Stapleton

Relationships with influential leaders in the political, private, and non-profit sectors to provide credibility and clout. Envision Utah, although non-political and non-partisan, has been strategic in establishing relationships with important political and social leaders in the greater Salt Lake City area. Governor Michael Leavitt is an honorary co-chairman of Envision Utah and a chief proponent for the values of the organization. After initially encountering some resistance to its ideas, Envision Utah has worked to build ties with members of the private sector, including prominent real estate developers, and with local non-profit and religious organizations. By convincing important members of the development community that it had popular support, Envision Utah has been able to build a diverse coalition. Envision Utah has also developed partnerships with local officials, in order to support local efforts to adopt and implement the principles articulated by the Quality Growth Strategy.

New mechanisms to encourage public participation within a community. The Teton County design charrettes - unprecedented in the community - were established to consider the future of several highways in the county, including State Road WY-390. The charrettes solicit feedback on ways to expand transportation access while reflecting the values of the Teton County community and its neighborhoods, many of which are small and sparsely populated. Teton County sought assistance from outside consultants to stage charrettes that would attract maximum participation and encourage public involvement in planning decisions.

Relationships with the media to generate discussion around issues of transportation and land use. In Salt Lake City, Envision Utah strategically involved local media outlets in its efforts to promote the integration of transportation and land use planning. By keeping the media informed of the issues with which it is concerned and by meeting with important members of the local press to argue that issues of growth and sustainability deserve coverage, Envision Utah has been successful in making livability a part of the political and popular discourse in the Greater Wasatch Area.

The use of professional partners to help articulate local vision. Teton County has sought professional assistance from planning consultants, including the Urban Land Institute, to assist the county in developing its community-based design charrettes. The use of professionals has helped the county to create planning tools and articulate a long-range vision for the future of transportation and land use in the region.

LEVERAGING RESOURCES

At each of the projects visited, the scan team observed the practice of combining funding from a number of sources. The opportunity to mix funds allows the projects to cover issue areas beyond transportation, including housing, economic development, and the environment. In addition to the TCSP Program, sources of funding used in Denver, Salt Lake City, and Teton County include other programs within the U.S. DOT; the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; local, county, and state governments; metropolitan and regional planning agencies; and private and public foundations and non-profit organizations. The resources used to support a particular project need not be solely financial; the experience of the projects visited indicates that other factors besides funding - including the local development climate and proximity to other projects - can be leveraged to realize the innovative coordination of transportation planning and land use policy.

The following are examples of successful efforts to leverage resources in the four projects visited:

Salt Lake City TRAX system

Salt Lake City TRAX system, with the Gateway retail center in the background

Grand Teton National Park

DEMONSTRATING RESULTS

The four projects visited already are demonstrating the results of their efforts in a variety of ways: through new methods of doing business, new partnerships formed, greater community understanding of the relationship between transportation and community preservation, recommendations for changes to policies and practices, and plans for specific implementation projects. In particular, each of the four projects has developed a range of new tools for thinking about and working with the coordination of transportation and land use policies. Stapleton and Envision Utah have also been recognized for the innovativeness of their work, garnering significant national and international commendations.

The following are examples of successful efforts at demonstrating results from the four projects visited:

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Through site visits, meetings with local representatives, and research into local activities, the scan team has developed the following conclusions and recommendations based on its visits to Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. Overall, these conclusions are drawn from observations of methods used by the projects visited in their efforts to reduce the need for future infrastructure investment; to increase mobility, particularly for access to employment; to protect and enhance the human and natural environment; to engage the public in planning decisions; and to improve the efficiency of the local transportation systems.

The conclusions and recommendations presented here are divided into two categories: Lessons Learned, which documents the challenges and opportunities encountered by the projects visited, and Strategies and Recommendations, which offers ideas and suggestions, to be used at all levels of government, for communities across the United States investigating the interrelationships between transportation planning and land use policies.

LESSONS LEARNED

The four projects visited by the scan team are each experimenting with new methods of planning for transportation infrastructure and for land use regulation. In all, they offer valuable lessons and ideas for other communities facing similar issues.

Pedestrian crossing in Salt Lake City

STRATEGIES AND APPROACHES

Observations made during the scan tour identified certain strategies that can be used, at both the local and national levels, to improve transportation planning and preserve and enhance communities. Some common strategies include the meaningful involvement of key stakeholders and community participants; the use of emerging analytic and public involvement techniques to inform decision-making; the consideration of a wide range of community, economic, and environmental impacts throughout the transportation process; and the importance of a close relationship between transportation and community planning.

The TRAX system in downtown Salt Lake City

The TRAX system in downtown Salt Lake City

APPENDIX A

AMPLIFYING QUESTIONS

Before embarking on the scan tour, the scan team developed a set of questions to be sent to the representatives with whom the team members would be meeting in each community. The questions were designed to guide the representatives in preparing for the visit of the scan team, presenting the topics and ideas that the scan team hoped to address during the visit. Among other issues, these amplifying questions covered the successes and challenges faced by each of the communities in their efforts to integrate transportation and land use planning, the outcome of those efforts, the mechanisms for developing partnerships and seeking public participation, and the role of government regulations in planning for transportation and land use. The amplifying questions also asked the project representatives to consider the ways in which the scan team could provide assistance and guidance to them.
  1. Project Description
    1. Type of project
    2. Origins
    3. Project sponsors and stakeholders
    4. Goals and objectives of the project
    5. Funding and budget
    6. Current project status
    7. Project evaluation


  2. Experiences
    1. What do you consider the major successes of the project?
    2. What were the most crucial elements that helped make the project work?
    3. What unexpected issues, events, and/or results have come out of the project?
    4. What were the major challenges/obstacles in undertaking this project?
    5. Are there missing elements that make the project less than it can be?
    6. What lessons have you learned that you would like to share with others facing similar situations?


  3. Public Involvement/Community Support
    1. Who was involved in the project?
    2. How were they involved?
    3. How were groups and individuals identified and drawn into the process?
    4. What was discovered through the public involvement process?
    5. How did public input affect the process of developing the project and the implementation of the project?
    6. Were all of the appropriate groups engaged or at least given the opportunity to participate? If not, what groups/individuals were missing or chose not to participate?
    7. How were local officials involved? Who were the advocates for the project? Was there any focused and significant opposition? If so, how was that addressed?
    8. If you had to redesign the public involvement process now, what would you do differently?


  4. Outcomes
    1. What has been accomplished? How were the initial goals of the project accomplished? Were new goals identified and adopted as the project advanced?
    2. Is the project considered a success? By whom? If so, why? If not, why not? What would make it a success?
    3. What are the next steps? What else may be changed or may be needed to advance this project and fully take advantage of what it has produced?
    4. What other projects or activities have been generated by or through this project? Has it created a synergistic effect with other projects or activities in the community? Have any laws, regulations, or major policies changed or been created as a result of this project?
    5. If unintended outcomes have resulted from this project, how have they been addressed, resolved, or made use of?
    6. What has project evaluation revealed?
    7. If you had to do the project again, what would you do differently?


  5. Technical Assistance/Policy Guidance
    1. Can the scan team provide any technical assistance to you or your community during the visit? If so, please describe the type of assistance requested.
    2. Can the scan team provide any policy guidance to you or your community during the visit? If so, please describe the type of policy guidance needed.
    3. What training do you recommend that FHWA develop and/or provide to communities to assist in better integrating transportation and land use planning?

APPENDIX B

PRINTED AND WEB-BASED MATERIALS

The following is a list of websites mentioned in this report and materials collected by the scan team during the tour.
  1. Denver Union Station

  2. http://www.denverunionstation.org Stapleton
    http://www.stapletondenver.com
    To receive copies of the documents from Stapleton, please contact:
    Mr. Tom Gleason
    Vice President - Public Relations for Stapleton
    1401 17th Street
    Suite 510
    Denver, Colorado 80202
    303.382.1800

     
  3. Envision Utah

  4. http://www.envisionutah.org

    To receive copies of the documents from Envision Utah, please contact:
    Ms. Anita Plascencia
    Business and Office Manager
    Envision Utah
    254 South 600 East
    Suite 201
    Salt Lake City, Utah 84102
    801.303.1451

     
  5. Teton County - Mapping for a Millennium

  6. http://www.tetonwyo.org/plan/
    To receive copies of the documents from Teton County, please contact:
    Ms. Teresa deGroh
    Principal Planner
    Teton County Planning and Development Department
    P.O. Box 1727
    200 South Willow Street
    Jackson, Wyoming 83001
    307.733.3959


APPENDIX C

PROJECT REPRESENTATIVES

Denver

Ms. Laura Aldrette
Stapleton Project Manager
Mayor's Office
201 West Colfax Avenue, Department 205
Denver, Colorado 80202
720.865.2957

Ms. Gwen S. Anderson
Denver Union Station Project Manager
1036 South Columbine Street
Denver, Colorado 80209
303.733.9100

Ms. Ellen Ittelson
Deputy Director
Denver Community Planning and Development Agency
201 West Colfax Avenue, Department 205
Denver, Colorado 80202
720.865.2915

Salt Lake City

Mr. Stephen Holbrook
Executive Director
Envision Utah
254 South 600 East
Suite 201
Salt Lake City, Utah 84102
801.303.1453

Ms. Kristin Thompson
Public Relations Manager
Envision Utah
254 South 600 East
Suite 201
Salt Lake City, Utah 84102
801.303.1452

Teton County - Mapping for a Millennium

Mr. William Collins
Director
Teton County Planning and Development Department
P.O. Box 1727
200 South Willow Street
Jackson, Wyoming 83001
307.733.3959

Ms. Teresa deGroh
Principal Planner
Teton County Planning and Development Department
P.O. Box 1727
200 South Willow Street
Jackson, Wyoming 83001
307.733.3959

APPENDIX D

SCAN TEAM PARTICIPANTS

Ms. Robin Smith, Co-Team Leader
Federal Highway Administration, Office of Planning
Planning Oversight and Stewardship Team
555 Zang Street
Room 427
Lakewood, Colorado 80228
303.969.5772 extension 327

Ms. Felicia Young, Co-Team Leader
Federal Highway Administration, Office of Planning
Planning Capacity Building Team
400 7th Street, SW
Washington, DC 20590
202.366.1263

Mr. Tom Bonds
Federal Highway Administration
Wyoming Division
1916 Evans Avenue
Cheyenne, Wyoming 82001
307.772.2004

Mr. William Haas
Federal Highway Administration
Colorado Division
555 Zang Street
Room 400
Lakewood, Colorado 80228
303.969.6730 extension 356

Mr. Harlan Miller
Federal Highway Administration
Utah Division
2520 West 4700 South
Suite 9A
Salt Lake City, Utah 84118
801.963.0182

Ms. Patricia Rincon-Kallman
Assistant Director
City of Houston Planning and Development Department
611 Walker
6th Floor
Houston, Texas 77002
713.837.7858

Mr. Harrison Rue
Executive Director
Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission and
Charlottesville-Albemarle Metropolitan Planning Organization
P.O. Box 1505
Charlottesville, Virginia 22902
434.979.7310

Ms. Emily Tait
Federal Highway Administration
Georgia Division
61 Forsyth Street, SW
Suite 17T100
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
404.562.3641

Ms. Cassandra Callaway
Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
Office of Planning and Policy Analysis (DTS-46)
55 Broadway
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142
617.494.3997

Ms. Katherine Fichter
Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
Office of Planning and Policy Analysis (DTS-46)
55 Broadway
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142
617.494.3571