PEER PROGRAM

 


Peer Exchanges, Planning for a Better Tomorrow, Transportation Planning Capacity Building

— Peer Exchange Report —


City of Federal Way Peer Exchange


Location: Federal Way, Washington
Date: November 14-15, 2018
Host Agency: City of Federal Way, Washington
National Peers: Cyrus Abhar, City of Rancho Cordova, California
Hans Friedel, AICP, City of Lone Tree, Colorado
Steve Hebert, AICP, City of Lone Tree, Colorado
Mark Thomas, City of Rancho Cordova, California

Local Peers: Emil King, AICP, City of Bellevue, Washington
Miranda Redinger, AICP, City of Shoreline, Washington
Federal Agencies: Federal Highway Administration
Federal Transit Administration

Summary

This report highlights key recommendations and noteworthy practices identified at the "City of Federal Way Peer Exchange" held on November 14-15, 2018 in Federal Way, Washington. This event was sponsored by the Transportation Planning Capacity Building (TPCB) Peer Program, which is jointly funded by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration (FTA). The goal of the peer exchange program is to facilitate knowledge transfer and capacity building by connecting peers from different states and/or agencies to exchange best practices and innovative solutions to transportation planning challenges.

Peer Exchange Overview

The Washington State Department of Transportation and Development (WSDOT), with support from the FHWA Washington Division, requested a peer exchange from the FHWA/FTA TPCB Program to assist the city of Federal Way as it develops from a suburban community into more of an urban community. Based on the results of a study concluded in 2009, Federal Way, a community just south of Seattle, requested access revisions at the existing South 320th Street-Interstate 5 interchange, which is already very congested during the morning and evening peak periods.

Federal Way is a suburban city and its city center is a designated regional growth center through the Puget Sound Regional Council's centers planning process. The city has been working to grow and densify the city center around the planned Sound Transit light rail station, which has the potential to transform Federal Way into a denser, multimodal city. Federal Way was looking to peer communities for other possible solutions to improve mobility in ways other than adding more pavement or access to already congested regional streets and highways.

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